Homesteading Nesterville: Dugouts and Vernacular Architecture on the Red Rolling Plains

Homesteading

Dr. Anderson's Blog

By Jahue E. Anderson

John G. Hardin and his family huddled underground in their home as the wind howled across the rolling plains and snow fell. The family had bought land with a dugout on it a couple miles south of the Red River. They sought shelter from the elements, especially the icy wind.  The dugout, a rectangular hole in the ground, lacked a door. Hardin used canvas from the wagon to improvise one. As the family hunkered down, snow accumulated on the canvas door. Hardin’s milk cow roamed above ground on the snow-covered farmstead, searching for shelter and the hapless cow fell through the canvas sheet and into the dugout. It sat peering in confusion at the Hardin family. John Hardin later wrote that he gestured toward the hole and the cow climbed up the dirt stairs and ran across the field, dragging in tow the wagon sheet. Hardin…

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Homesteading Nesterville: Dugouts and Vernacular Architecture on the Red Rolling Plains

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