The World of Reggae Music Collection–Super Hits: Roots Reggae

In this edition of the World of Reggae Music Collection the selector drops the greatest roots reggae hits. This is a selection of Reggae’s Superhits from all the greatest reggae legends. From rock and roll hall of famers like Bob Marley & the Wailers and Jimmy Cliff to grammy award winners like Burning Spear to the Jamaican icons Alton Ellis and Toots & The Maytals regge’s greatest songs make this compilation.

Dawn Penn You Don’t Love Me (No, No, No)

Alton Ellis I’m Still in Love with You

Bob Marley & the Wailers Three Little Birds

Junior BylesCurley Locks

Horace AndyMoney, Money (aka The Root Of All Evil)

Devon Irons – Vampire

Burning SpearDoor Peep

Junior MurvinPolice & Thieves

Toots & The MaytalsReggae Got Soul

Bob Marley & the WailersNo Woman, No Cry (Live)

Jimmy Cliff Sitting In Limbo

Buju Banton & Tenor SawRing The Alarm Quick

Steel PulseYour House

Gregory Isaacs & the Revolutionaries My Number One

Barrington LevyPrison Oval Rock

Desmond Dekker & the AcesIsraelites

The Pioneers Starvation

Althea & DonnaUptown Top Ranking

Joe HiggsThe World Is Upside Down

Dennis BrownMoney In My Pocket (1978 Version)

Steel Pulse – Steppin’ Out

Israel VibrationRudeboy Shufflin’

Third World Sense Of Purpose

Bob Marley & the Wailers Could You Be Loved

Third WorldNow That We’ve Found Love

Ziggy Marley & the Melody MakersTomorrow People

Gregory IsaacsRumours

Jimmy Cliff – Guns of Brixton

Toots & the MaytalsPain In My Heart

Peter Tosh & Mick Jagger(You Gotta Walk And) Don’t Look Back

Sean PaulTemperature

SizzlaTaking Over

Anthony B Fire Pon Rome

Anthony B – Fire Come Now

Junior Reid – One Blood

Bounty KillerDown In The Ghetto

Steel Pulse Roller Skates

Half PintNo Stress Express

Dave & Ansel Collins Double Barrel

Capleton – Wings of the Morning

Jimmy Cliff – Shelter of Your Love

Shabba Ranks Twice My Age

DirtsmanHot This Year

Mr. Vegas & Sean Paul – Haffi Get Da Gal Yah

CapletonEverybody

Bob Marley & the Wailers Buffalo Soldier

Toots & the MaytalsJohnny Coolman

Buju Banton & Third WorldSense Of Purpose

Ken Boothe In the Summertime

AlborosieBlue Movie Boo

Burning Spear – Step It

Steel Pulse – Back to My Roots/Dub to My Roots

Busy Signal – Reggae Music Again

Jimmy Cliff – Reggae Music

Stephen Marley – No Cigarette Smoking (In My Room)

Sinead O’Connor – Door Peep

Cocoa Tea – Rough Inna Town

Steel Pulse – Worth His Weight in Gold (Rally Round)

Kymani Marley, Buju Banton, and Mr. Vegas – Party In Session

 

The World of Reggae Music Collection–Super Hits: Roots Reggae

World of Reggae Music Collection–Roots and Culture: Slavery Days

World of Reggae Music Collection: Roots and Culture

Slavery Days

In the final edition of the Roots and Culture volume of the World of Reggae Music Collection the selector presents Slavery Days. Over 400 years of slavery ravaged the Atlantic world. And in fact, the legacy of slavery has been nearly as destructive. The African Holocaust, as some in the reggae profession have termed the catastrophic event, unleashed horrific consequences for the people of Africa and for those enslaved Africans transplanted to the islands of the Caribbean.

Jamaican reggae artists played many of their Roots and Culture songs about the history and legacy of slavery. The iconic Burning Spear recorded one of the most enduring songs in this vein called “Slavery Days.” The Wailers recorded “Slave Driver” on the classic reggae album Catch A Fire. Both the Bob Marley and The Wailers full-band version of “Redemption Song (Band Version)” and the Bob Marley’s acoustic version of “Redemption Song (Album Version)” appears on this edition. Some of these songs of slavery are in fact songs of freedom.

The bands Steel Pulse, Culture, Third World, and the Wailing Souls; the reggae stars Gregory Isaacs, Lee Scratch Perry, Junior Byles, Judy Mowatt, and Peter Tosh; and the dancehall singjays Capleton, Anthony B, and Macka B all played wonderful roots tunes about the issues dealing with slavery and its impacts.

Burning SpearSlavery Days

Burning Spear – I and I Survive

Bob Marley & the Wailers Redemption Song (Band Version)

Junior Delgado & Lee “Scratch” Perry Sons Of Slaves

CultureToo Long In Slavery

Peter ToshDownpressor Man

Dennis Brown – Africa

Kabaka Pyramid – Never Gonna Be a Slave

Glen BrownNo More Slavery

Steel PulseKu Klux Klan

Third World1865 (96º In The Shade)

Busy Signal – Modern Day Slavery

Stephen Marley – Old Slaves

Bob Marley & the Wailers – Slave Driver

Sly & Robbie – Slave Driver Dub

Gregory Isaacs & Soul SyndicateSlavemaster

Peter Tosh & the Wailers400 Years (Jamaican Version)

Toots & the MaytalsNever Get Weary

CulturePay Day

Lloyd ParksSlaving (Every Day)

Junior Byles  & Lee “Scratch” PerryA Place Called Africa

Lucky DubeSlave

Beres Hammond – Another Day in the System

Stephen Marley – Made in Africa

Jah Bouks – No Slave

Black-Am-I – Modern Day Freedom

Third World Human Market Place

Steel Pulse – African Holocaust

Sizzla – Make It Right (Remix)

Bob Marley & the WailersRedemption Song (Album Version)

NEED

Prince Malachi – Runaway Slave

Macka B – Effects Of Slavery

Delton Screechie – Sweet Africa

Winston Prince – A Place Called Africa

Bongo Herman – African Drums

Sylford Walker – Africa Homeland

King Tubby – Africa Dub

Audley Rollens – Repatriation

Judy Mowatt – Slave Queen

Capleton – Slave Master

Anthony B – Slavery

Wailing Souls – Modern Slavery

Gregory Isaacs – Slave Master Dub

Gregory Issacs & Ranking Buckers – Slave Master / Captives

Gregory Isaacs – Runaway Slave

Dennis Alcapone & Junior Byles – Africa Stand (Place Called Africa Version)

World of Reggae Music Collection–Roots and Culture: Slavery Days

World of Reggae Music Collection–Roots and Culture: Political Reggae

The World of Reggae Music Collection: Roots and Cultrue Political Reggae Often reggae carries a strong political message wrapped inside its intoxicating vibes. Reggae superstars Jimmy Cliff, Peter Tosh, Yellowman, Eek-A-Mouse, and Bob Marley and The Wailers have a broad knowledge of the plight of the poor people around the world. In turn these reggae artists have fashioned brilliant protest songs that bring attention to international social injustice. From Jimmy Cliff’sVietnam” to Ziggy Marley And The Melody Makersperforming “Namibia” decades of reggae artists have expressed their political viewpoints through music. One of my favorite American musicians that often drenches his original music in reggae sounds, Michael Franti, leads the California-based band Spearhead with hard-hitting lyrics. His message of love trumps the political message, but his songs are filled with deep knowledge of social, economic, and political issues. Micheal Franti & Spearhead are a must in this edition of Roots and Culture. From modern dancehall artists like Busy SignalMavado, I-Wayne, Perfect, Sizzla, and Alborosie to the classic reggae bands like the The Mighty Diamonds, Steel Pulse, and Black Uhuruthe mainstream political worldview often comes into question in these great reggae tracks. And there were strong positive-minded individuals from Jamaica like Hugh Mundell and Jacob Miller that pointed out the of the hypocrisies of these bad-minded politicians. Some reggae artists even called for social revolution in their music. Peter Tosh said it best in his song “Equal Rights” “I don’t want no peace. I want equal rights and justice. Gotta to get it. Equal rights and justice.”

Jimmy Cliff Vietnam

YellowmanLeave Iraq Alone

Bob Marley and the WailersZimbabwe

Peter Tosh Equal Rights

Michael Franti and Spearhead Crime To Be Broke In America

Dennis Brown – Revolution, Pt. 1

Gregory Isaacs & the UpsettersMr. Cop

Eek-A-Mouse – Politics

Bob Marley & the Wailers – I Shot The Sheriff

Horace Andy – Materialist

Horace Andy – Poor Man Style

Cocoa Tea – Barack Obama

Tony Rebel – I Can’t Recall

Yellowman – CNN News

Gregory Isaacs, Soul Syndicate, & the Heptones – Black a Kill Black

Burro Banton & Cornell Campbell – Pressure

Michael Franti & SpearheadTime To Go Home

Black Uhuru – Youth Of Eglington

Black Uhuru – Youth (Dub)

Steel Pulse – No Justice No Peace

Cutty Ranks – New World Order

Brooklyn Jungle Soundsystem – Kulture (Dubmatix Rub-A-Dub Revival Remix)

Jacob MillerRoman Soldiers Of Babylon

Steel Pulse – Taxi Driver

Alborosie – America

Desmond Dekker – Problems

Horace Andy – Leave Rasta

Black Uhuru – General Penitentiary

Busy Signal – Running From The Law

Snoop Lion & Akon – Tired of Running

Esco Levi – Bleaching Shop

Cocoa Tea – Oil Ting

Alborosie – Tax War

Ziggy Marley & the Melody Makers – We Propose

Lucky Dube – Soldier

Manu Chao –  Politick Kills

Steel Pulse Global Warning

Michael Franti & Spearhead – Yell Fire!

Alpha BlondyApartheid Is Nazism

Barrington Levy – Mandela Free

Alborosie – Police

Snoop Lion & Cori B – No Guns Allowed

Raging Fyah – World Crisis

Cocoa Tea – Mr. Neck Tie Man

Lucky Dube – Victims

Gentleman – It No Pretty

Steel Pulse – Tribute to the Martyrs

Alborosie – Global War

Cocoa Tea – Moving On

Ziggy Marley & the Melody Makers – Namibia

Jimmy Cliff – Children’s Bread

J Boog – Change Up Your Evil Ways

Steel Pulse – Earth Crisis

Alborosie – What If Jamaica

Cocoa Tea – Zeeks

Steel Pulse – Black and Proud

Marshel – New World Order

Alborosie – Games

Joe Higgs – Wave Of War

NEED

Papa LeviBush & Blair

I-WaynePolitics And Religion

YellowmanAids

Mavado – We Need Barack

Hugh Mundell Africa Must Be Free By 1983

Big YouthPolitical Confusion

Busy Signal Politics

Black UhuruSolidarity

Ranking Trevor & Wailing Souls – War

Perfect – Hanging Day

Bushman – World State

Admiral Bailey Politician

Hugh MundellRun Revolution A Come

Junior DelgadoHypo

Buju Banton – Immigration Law

No 1 Station – Bush War

Sugar Minott Nah Go To South Africa

Bushman World Crisis

Israel Vibration Racial Discrimination

SizzlaBlack Man In The White House

Israel VibrationNatty Dread

Jacob MillerJolly Joseph

The Mighty Diamonds, Suga Roy, & Conrad CrystalPolice And Bad Boy Strap

SizzlaThe Solution

Sugar MinottNah Follow Fashion

Buju BantonPolitics Time Again

Cocoa TeaBuju

Horace Andy – No Love in the City

Horace Andy – Problems

Peter Tosh – Fire Fire Babylon Burning

The Royals – Sufferer of the Ghetto

Jah Lion – Soldier and Police War

Barry Brown – Politician

Cultural Roots – Thieves, Liars, and Criminals

The Valentines – Stop the Violence

Gregory Isaacs – Lonely Soldier

Joe Gibbs & the Professionals – State of Emergency

Garnett Silk – Cry of my People

Jah Lloyd – Soldier Round the Corner

Max Romeo – Public Enemy Number One

Ranking Joe – Back Wey You Vulutres

Welton Irie – Ghettoman Corner

John Wayne – Call the Police

Scientist – Mass Murder and Corruption

Romain VirgoGhetto

LorenzoGun Play

KonshensWar Straight

Perfect – Amerimaka

Dillinger – Buckingham Palace

Peter Metro – Police in England

Lucky Dube – Political Games

Barrington Levy – Soldier

Culture – World Peace

World of Reggae Music Collection–Roots and Culture: Political Reggae

World of Reggae Music–Roots and Culture: Rastaman

World of Reggae Music: Roots and Culture

Rastaman

Red, gold, and green flags emblazoned with the Lion of Judah fly above swirling clouds of ganja smoke while pulsing bass and driving reggae riddims flow through sound systems stacked ten-feet high. This edition of the World of Reggae Music Collection is entitled Roots and Culture. This first volume of Roots and Culture features the Rastaman. The Rastaman is an integral part of Caribbean culture and the reggae movement.

Rita Marleyintroduced Robert Nesta Marley to the foundations of the Rastafarian religion or “way of life.” She had seen the Emperor of Ethiopia Haile Selassie I on his visit to Jamaica and had been struck by the spirit on seeing what she believed to be an incarnation of God, Jah Rastafari. Bob Marley and The Wailers later became a great messenger of the “king’s music.”

Bob Marley and The Wailers, the I-Threes (Rita Marley, Judy Mowatt, and Marcia Griffiths), Peter Tosh, and Bunny Wailerall professed to the wisdom of Jah in their music. Not only did Marley and the Wailer family play roots and culture reggae, but so did the great rastaman icons Burning Spear, Dennis Brown, and Jacob Miller. The Rastafarian-inspired bands The Abyssinians, Black Uhuru, Aswad, Gladiators, The Melodians, The Mighty Diamonds, Steel Pulse, Culture,Wailing Souls, Third World, Israel Vibration, The Itals, and The Heptones rocked reggae for crowds of thousands of listeners and fired the souls and imaginations of millions of fans.

Not only the great reggae bands played tribute to the roots and culture of the rastaman, but so did the finest singjays from Dillinger, Barrington Levy, Ranking JoeSizzla, and Luciano to Buju Banton, Half Pint, Capleton, Anthony B, and Konshens. From the young to the old, from Tarrus Riley, Gyptian, Morgan Heritage, Alborosie, and Bushman to the old-school reggae originals of Jimmy RileyHorace Andy, Johnny Clarke, and Cornell Campbell, Rastafarian culture and reggae still captures the pulse of an Island people.

The AbyssiniansSatta Massagana

Capleton – Raggy Road

Bob Marley & the WailersRastaman Chant

Sly & Robbie – Rastaman Chant

Stephen Marley & Ziggy Marley – The Chapel

Black Uhuru & the Revolutionaries Dread In The Mountain

AswadCandles

The Melodians Rivers Of Babylon

Linval Thompson & U-Roy – Don’t Cut Off Your Dreadlocks & Joyful Locks

Steel PulseNot King James Version

Josey Wales – Bobo Dread

VC – By His Deeds

Bob Marley & The Wailers – Rastaman Live Up!

Burning Spear – Old Marcus Garvey

Burning Spear – Farther East of Jack

Chronixx – Capture Land

Sizzla – Praise Ye Jah

Peter ToshIgziabeher (Let Jah Be Praised)

Alborosie & Michael Rose – Callin’

Barrington LevyA Yah We Deh

Bunny Wailer, Toot & the MaytalsTake A Trip

The Heptones Cool Rasta

Luciano – It’s Me Again Jah

The ShadowsBrother Noah

Buju Banton – Untold Stories

Gregory IsaacsThief a Man

Jacob MillerTenement Yard

Israel Vibration Jericho

Busy Signal – Nah Follow Dem

Morgan HeritageDown By The River

Bob Marley & the Wailers Positive Vibration

The Mighty Diamonds – I Need A Roof

Ini Kamoze – I Want Ital

Delroy Wilson – Rascal Man

Tony Rebel – Jah Is By My Side

Kiddus I – Graduation In Zion

Sizzla – Rastaman Chant

Third World – Cool Meditation

Jah Cure – Trod in the Valley

Dennis Brown – To the Foundation

Luciano & Sizzla – Jah Blessing

Fred Locks – Black Star Liner

Willie Williams – Armagideon Time

Bob Marley & the Wailers – Jah Live

Sly & Robbie – Jah Live

Raging Fyah – Jah Glory

The Abyssinians – Declaration Of Rights

Buju Banton – Give I Strength

Steel Pulse – Babylon Makes The Rules

Chronixx – Rastaman Wheel Out

Burning Spear – Red, Gold & Green

Burning Spear – Workshop

Alborosie – I Rusalem

The Wailing Souls – Kingdom Rise Kingdom Fall

Black Uhuru – Whole World Is Africa

Alton Ellis – Back To Africa

Gentleman – Jah Jah Never Fail

Tenor Saw – Jah Guide and Protect Me

Tenor Saw – Jah Guide Dub

Alborosie – Rastafari Anthem

Bob Marley & the Wailers – Natty Dread

Irie Love – Put Jah First

Garnett Silk – Kingly Character

Horace Andy – Psalm 68

Horace Andy – Dub 68

Half Pint – Bless Us

Buju Banton – ‘Til I’m Laid To Rest

Johnny Clarke – Satta Massagana

I-Roy – Satta

Cocoa Tea – Heathen

Anthony B & Horace Andy – Enter The Kingdom of Zion

J.O.E. – Rasta Chant

The Abyssinians – Y Mas Gan

Alborosie – Dung A Babylon

Toyan – Dread in a Babylon

Damian Marley & Nas – Africa Must Wake Up

Sugar Minott – Black Roots

Burning Spear – Lion

Third World – Dreamland

Tarrus Riley – Love Created I

Johnny Clarke – Be Holy My Brothers And Sisters

Israel Vibration – We a De Rasta

Burning Spear – Jah No Dead

Bob Marley & the Wailers – Iron Lion Zion

Tenor Saw – Who’s Gonna Help Me Praise

Black-Am-I – Samson Strength

Black Uhuru – I Love King Selassie

Mad Cobra – Salassi I Rule

The Mighty Diamonds – Africa

Busy Signal – Jah Love

Ranking Joe & Michael Rose – Poor Man Struggle

Alborosie – Humbleness

Steel Pulse – Biko’s Kindred Lament

The Gladiators – Roots Natty

Sizzla – Black Woman & Child

Busy Signal – Run Whey

Gentleman – Strange Things

Raging Fyah – Music Isn’t Biased

Alborosie – Still Blazing

Yabby You – Conquering Lion

Burning Spear – Calling Rastafari

The Itals – Roll River Jordan

Johnny Clarke – Enter Into His Gates

Third World – Satta Massagana

Raging Fyah – Behold

Israel Vibration – Sodom and Gomarrah

Cornell Campbell – Lion of Judah

Freddie McGregor – Be Alright

Anthony B – Give Praises

Cocoa Tea – Holy Mount Zion

Bunny Wailer – Rastaman

The Mighty Diamonds – jah Will Work It Out

Johnny Clarke – False Rasta

Alborosie – Grow Your Dreads

Richie Spice – Better Tomorrow

Alton Ellis – True Born African

Black Uhuru – Leaving to Zion

Culture – Get Ready To Ride The Lion To Zion

Aswad – Back To Africa

The Mighty Diamonds – Jah Jah Bless The Dreadlocks

Ras Michael And The Sons Of Negus – Rise Jah Jah Children (The Lion Sleeps)

The Wailing SoulsJah Give Us Life

Winston Francis Going to Zion

Sylford Walker & Welton Irie – Chant Down Babylon

Alborosie – Call Up Jah

Morgan Heritage – Hail Up the Lion

Michael Prophet – Jah Love

NEED

Capleton & Luciano – Hail King Selassie

SizzlaReally And Truly

Patrick Andy – Living in Mount Zion

Wayne Wade – Poor and Humble

Ras Bug – Fisherman

I-Roy – Rootsman

Freddie McGregor – Rastaman Camp

Willie Francis – Let’s Go To Zion

Earth & Stone – False Ruler

BushmanKing Selassie I

Determinejah a mi sponsor

LucianoJah Is My Navigator

Horace Andy – Children of Israel

Justin Hinds & the Dominoes – Jordan River

Sugar Minott – Rome

Devon Irons – When Jah Comes

Max Romeo – Babylon’s Burning

Luciano – Jah Live

Morgan Heritage – Set Yourself Free

Bushman – What’s the Matter With the World

Beres Hammond & Flourgon – I Love Jah

Garnett Silk – Mama Africa

Culture – Humble African

Anthony Cruz & Marlene Johnson – Africa

Tarrus Riley – Marcus Teaching

Sylford Walker – Jah Golden Pen

Black Uhuru – Going To Zion

Hell & Fire – Show Us The Way

Little Roy – Bongo Nyah

Junior Byles – King Of Babylon

Konshens – Rasta Imposter

Luciano & Candy Man – Dem No Know Jah

Max Roemo, Conrad Crystal, & Suga Roy – Chant Rasta

Peter Tosh – Mama Africa

Alborosie – I Am

Frankie Paul – Red, Gold, and Green

Cornell Campbell – I Heart Is Clean/Zinc Fence

Dillinger – Gate Number

Pancho Alphonso & the Revolutionaries – Never Give Up In Babylon

Burning Spear – Jah Is Real

Jimmy Riley – Tell The Youths The Truth

Dolphin Morris & Prince Far I – Su Su Pan Rasta / Heavy Manners

Gregory Isaacs – Babylon Too Rough

Culture – Jah Rastafari 

The Wailing Souls – They Don’t Know Jah

Jacob Miller – I’m A Rastaman

Conrad Crystal, Suga Roy, & Gyptian – Jah Jah See Dem

Jah Is My Navigator

World of Reggae Music–Roots and Culture: Rastaman

The World of Reggae Music Collection–Vintage Reggae: The Early Years

World of Reggae Music Collection: Vintage Reggae

The Early Years

The Jam-Tex selector digs deeper into the reggae genre, focusing in on some of reggae’s earliest hits. Positive vibrations drip from songs like Dobby Dobson‘s Loving Pauper” and The Pioneers‘ “Let Your Yeah Be Yeah.”  Reggae legends Bob Marley & The Wailers, Toots & The Maytals, and Delroy Wilson all laid down foundational tracks during this early period of reggae music.

This particular collection features early vintage hits from the well-known male artists like John Holt, Alton Ellis, Desmond Dekker, Johnny Clarke, Ken Boothe, and Bob Andyand female artists Marcia Griffiths, Susan Cadogan, and my favorite Phyllis Dillon. Many of the musicians from the rock steady era like Derrick Morgan and Stranger Colerecorded early reggae hits. Alongside the more well-known vocalists, this collection features lesser-known artists like K.C. White and Watty Burnett, who laid down infectious reggae tunes like “No No No (You Don’t Love Me Anymore)” and “Rainy Night in Portland.”

Here in the early reggae cuts you find amazing originality. Dennis Brown tracks like “Westbound Train” and “Man Next Door” encapsulate the raw power of reggae. And, Delroy Wilson‘s bass heavy “Better Must Come” might be the greatest reggae song ever recorded. Plus the early Bob Marley & the Wailers’ songs forged music and message into a powerful punch. Together Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, and Bunny Wailer recorded original classics like “Mr. Brown,” “Try Me,” and “Jailhouse.” These legends of reggae music would forever change the course of music history.

Bob Marley & the Wailers Mr. Brown

Errol DunkeleyOk Fred

Marie Bryant – Tomatoes

Delroy Wilson(I’m in A) Dancing Mood

Alton Ellis – Mad Mad

Don Evans & the Paragons Danger in Your Eyes

Dandy LivingstonRudy, a Message to You

Ken BootheOld Fashioned Way

Phyllis DillonWoman In the Ghetto

Toots & the MaytalsMonkey Man

Barrington Levy Sister Carol

Desmond Dekker Reggae Recipe

Dennis BrownMan Next Door

Susan CadoganNice And Easy

Horace Andy Natural Mystic

Don Carlos & Roots RadicsFight Fight

Johnny Clarke Don’t Trouble Trouble

Toots & the MaytalsDo The Reggay

The Pioneers Let Your Yeah Be Yeah

U-Roy Hold On

Derrick & PatsyHousewives Choice

Lord CreatorDon’t Stay Out Late

Dobby DobsonLoving Pauper

Roman Stewart Try Me

Leroy Smart Ballistic Affair

Bob Andy & Marcia Griffiths Young Gifted And Black

K.C. WhiteNo No No

Horace AndyDo You Love My Music

Bruce RuffinRain

Delroy WilsonIt’s A Shame

Johnny Clarke Tears on My Pillow

Cornell Campbell & the AggrovatorsI Will Never Change/Version

Desmond DekkerFu Man Chu

Derrick MorganTougher Than Tough (Rudie In Court)

Dennis BrownWestbound Train

KingstonianNice Nice

Bob Marley & the Wailers Bend Down Low

Jacob Miller Mr. Officer

Owen GrayMidnight Track

Delroy Wilson Living In The Foots Steps Of Another Man

Alton EllisAin’t That Loving You (For More Reasons Than One)

Bob Marley & the WailersOne Cup Of Coffee

Delroy WilsonRun Run

Peter Tosh You Can’t Fool Me Again

Lord CreatorIndependent Jamaica

John Holt & Alton EllisRum Bumper’s

Bob Marley & the WailersTry Me

Bob Marley & the Wailers – Try Me (Version)

Desmond Dekker – Mother Pepper

Derrick MorganI Am The Ruler

The TennorsRide Me Donkey

The MajesteriansIf I Didn’t Want Your Loving

Alton Ellis & Phyllis DillonWhy Did You Leave Me To Cry

Delroy WilsonCool Operator

Al Barry & the CimaronsMorning Sun

Watty BurnettRainy Night in Portland

Stranger & Patsy – Give Me The Right

Alton Ellis – If I Could Rule the World

Lord Power – Adults Only (AKA Big Race)

Lord Messam – Linstead Market

The World of Reggae Music Collection–Vintage Reggae: The Early Years

Friday at Austin City Limits Music Festival 2009!!!

Wavin' Flag

The rain fell as the music filled the park. Mud seethed underfoot and gushed between toes. Among the strong aromas and beautiful sounds, the 2009 Austin City Limits Music Festival came alive and offered another memorable year of music. Although environmental factors change from year to year, from stifling heat and dust to drenching rain and mud, the show never stopped. The music continued. And Austin proved itself again as the live music capitol of the world.

I caught Dr. Dog at the Dell Stage for my first show. I found these boys from Philadelphia to be quite harmonic, reminiscent of the psychadelia rock of the Beatles and The Byrds. Songs like “The Breeze” and “The Old Days” displayed that smooth 1960s sound. But my favorite song on the set list was “The Rabbit, The Bat & The Reindeer.”

I had heard of Phoenix, but I had never listened to their music. A friend convinced me to see this alternative rock band from Versaille, France. The comparisons to their French peers Daft Punk and Air interested me. Ultimately I understood the comparisons, finding the sound close to a New Order-like electronica pop. Phoenix pleasantly surprised me with tunes like “Lisztomania,” “Lasso,” “If I Ever Feel Better,” “Fences,” “Girlfriend,” “Run Run Run,” “Too Young,” “Rome,” and “1901.” Many of the songs appear on the new album Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix.

The best show of the day came from the Somalian born/Canadian based rapper k’naan. Under the Wildflower Tent the slender Somalian rocked the crowd with political prose, heart-felt lyrics, and blistering beats. Appropriate adjectives include humble, inspirational, and talented.  k’naan had a broad appeal, drawing young children and old people, and all those between the young and old. An intimate performance captivated the crowd.

The track “T.I.A. [Explicit]” thundered bass as K’naan introduced the crowd to his unique brand of hip-hop. “T.I.A.” samples Bob Marley’s classic ska tune “Simmer Down,” layers it over heavy beats, and atop raps the brilliant young wordsmith. In Africa, Bob Marley, Lucky Dube, 2pac, and The Notorious B.I.G. reign supreme. k’naan studied these great performers and his sound reflects those influences. Yet the sound is original. The music is gangsta but peaceful, hard but soft, and always chalk full of the contradictions and realities of life.

From Africa the Somalian took us on a trip to “America.” On the album, Mos Def and Chali 2Na join the track with their rhymes on the studio version of “America,”  but solo and live K’naan brought this song to its full potential without the help of these great lyricists. The song “Take A Minute” brought emotion to the tent. The following love ballad “Fatima” lightened the mood. And then the hardcore rap song “ABC’s” (with a Chubb Rock sample) rocked the and rolled with pure energy.

K’naan then sang a song about “Somalia,” which brought tears to the crowd’s eyes. The lyricist played two different versions beginning with an acapella and moving into a full band version. As K’naan says “his real will makes your real look like a rental.” This track talks about the perils of childhood in Somalia and the suffering of the people. K’naan harnesses the pain and realities of the world and turns them into amazing poetry. The rapper followed the tear jerker with “Bang Bang,” a nice jamming pop tune. And he ended his set with the a sing-a-long to “Wavin’ Flag.”

K’naan was the highlight of the evening. But the jams continued with Thievery Corporation. The dub electronica duo and band played on the main stage this year kicking out funky electronica with “.” The crew from Washington, D.C. also played the sitar heavy “Mandala,” displaying their unique acumen at world music.

In a testimony to the diversity of the music at ACL I caught parts of sets from the Texas country group Reckless Kelly and the hard-rocking new super trio Them Crooked Vultures. Them Crooked Vultures features bassist John Paul Jones of Led Zeppelin, drummer David Grohl of Nirvana and Foo Fighters, and Josh Homme the guitarist and lead singer from Queens Of The Stone AgeKings Of Leon headlined Friday night playing their hits “Sex On Fire,”
”On Call,” and
”Use Somebody.”

The  music continued after the festival at the ACL after shows. I went to a Township Records showcase at the Ghost Room downtown on 4th Street in the Warehouse District. I caught the end of Danny Malone‘s set. This kid has a beautifully haunting voice. My wife described him as a creepy James Taylor. His new album Cuddlebug features the eerie track “Basement.” Graham Wilkinson & the Underground Township played some of my favorite tracks from the new album Yearbook, including “Ragamuffin” and “Let It Go.”

Let It Go

Friday at Austin City Limits Music Festival 2009!!!