Top Ranking Albums of October 2012

TOP RANKING ALBUMS OF OCTOBER 2012 

[CLICK ON THE ALBUM COVER FOR MORE INFO ON THE ALBUM!!!]

Jerry DouglasTraveler [eOne Music 2012]

Neil YoungPsychadelic Pill [Reprise Records 2012]

Beres HammondOne Love, One Life [VP Records 2012]

Jimmy LaFaveDepending on the Distance [Music Road Records 2012]

Cocoa TeaIn A Di Red [Roaring Lion Records 2012]

Iris DementSing the Delta [FlariElla Records 2012]


Richie SpiceSoothing Sounds [Tad’s Records 2012]

Dwight Yoakam3 Pears [Via Records 2012]

GyptianSLR – EP [VP Records 2012]

Ry CooderElection Special [Nonesuch Records 2012]

The CoupSorry to Bother You [Anti/Epitaph 2012]

Cody ChesnuttLanding on a Hundred [Vibration Vineyard 2012]

Gary Clark, Jr. – Black and Blu [Warner Brothers 2012]

John HiattMystic Pinball [New West 2012]

Various ArtistsThe Man With the Iron Fists [Soul Temple Entertainment 2012]

The Mountain GoatsTranscendental Youth [Merge Records 2012]

Jamey JohnsonLiving For A Song: A Tribute to Hank Cochran [Mercury Nashville 2012]

Solo BantonHigher Levels [Reality Shock Records 2012]

John Brown’s BodyJBB in Dub [Easy Star Records 2012]

General DegreeSnapple Dapple Vol. 1 [Size 8 Records 2012]

Prezident Brown and Axx of JahpostlesI Sound Is From Creation [Tad’s Records 2012]

Top Ranking Albums of October 2012

Top Ranking Albums of December 2011

1. The Uprising Roots BandSkyfiya [TRU Music 2011]

2. Lisa HanniganPassenger [ATO Records 2011]

3. CommonThe Dreamer, The Believer [Think Common 2011]

4. Various ArtistsHeart and Soul Riddim [Notice Productions 2011]

5. Florence + the MachineCeremonials [Universal Records 2011]

6. The Mighty Mighty BosstonesThe Magic of Youth [Big Rig Records 2011]

7. Major LazerOriginal Don [Downtown Records 2011]

8. Raging FyahJudgement Day [Raging Fyah 2011]

9. BeirutThe Rip Tide [Pompeii Records 2011]

10. Various Artists – Dancehall Reggae Playlist Vol. 2 [Tad’s Records 2011]

11. CultsCults [Columbia 2011]

12. Ry CooderPull Up Some Dust and Sit Down [Nonesuch 2011]

13. Sierra HullDaybreak [Rounder Records 2011]

14. Various ArtistsSolid Gold, Vol. 1 [Don Corleon Records 2011]

15. Various ArtistsBomboflow Riddim [Upsetta Records 2011]

16. Ital NoizEveryday Jungle [Universal Egg 2011]

Top Ranking Albums of December 2011

Rocksteady: The Roots of Reggae

I was lucky enough to be in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada to see the opening of the film Rocksteady: The Roots of Reggae by Swiss director Stascha Bader. What a wonderful film. Just amazing. The film narrated by Stranger Cole captures rocktsteady legends reuniting to cut an album of legendary hits and perform a reunion concert. The impressive lineup included Stranger Cole, U-Roy, Hopeton LewisSly Dunbar, Ernest Ranglin, Judy Mowatt, Marcia Griffiths, Rita Marley, Dawn Penn, Ken Boothe, Derrick Morgan, Leroy Sibbles, the Tamlins, Gladstone Anderson, Hux Brown, Bongo Herman, and Scully Simms. Moss “Mossman” Raxlen, the Montreal based reggae producer recorded the reunion session at Tuff Gong Studios in Kingston, Jamaica.

The king of the toasters U-Roy performs “Stop that Train.” This version is amazing and steeped in deep meaning. For historical context one must know about the trains in Jamaica and the boom and bust of economic development in newly independent Jamaica (Jamaica won independence from the United Kingdom in 1963). The film does a brilliant job of contextualizing the songs. We know exactly where U-Roy is coming from when he toasts over this classic tune. After the bust the trains stopped, the jobs ran out, the rude boys started to roam the streets, and many Jamaicans sought jobs overseas. When U-Roy toasts over “Stop That Train” he talks about the trains stopping and the people leaving. There is so much soul and history and culture wrapped into one song.

The vocal-group trio the Tamlins are in tip top form and the band leader/guitarist Ernest Ranglin has still got the goods. The drummer Sly Dunbar forms the backbone of the band as he has for decades and the rest of the legendary studio musicians perform magnificently recapturing the fire of the past.

There are some real gems in this film. Hopeton Lewis lays down the rocksteady anthem “Take It Easy” and later sings an excellent rocksteady version of “Rivers of Babylon.” Dawn Penn records her bread and butter track “You Don’t Love Me (No, No, No)” and she talks about the endurance and popularity of the song. Derrick Morgan’s “Tougher Than Tough,” Ken Boothe’s Freedom Street,” Leroy Sibbles’s “Equal Rights,” and Judy Mowatt’s “Silent River Runs Deep” all appear, as well as a great rendition of Desmond Dekker’s classic “007 (Shanty Town)” by Ken Boothe. Marcia Griffiths performs “The Tide Is High” and reminiscences with Judy Mowatt about their time with the producer Coxsone Dodd, the legendary vocal group the I-Threes and with Bob Marley and the Wailers. A guest appearance by Rita Marley follows the widow through Trenchtown where she elaborates on the conditions of the ghetto and recalls her time with Bob in the yard.

I don’t want to give too much away about the film, but it will make you smile, laugh, and tap your toes. For people interested in music and culture, I highly recommend seeing this film. The album will release on the heels of the movie. The Rocksteady: The Roots of Reggae album, which releases in August 2009, promises to be a big hit too. Many critics are comparing it to the Buena Vista Social Club, but I think it will be even bigger than Ry Cooder’s classic documentary about Cuban jazzmasters. Rocksteady will be an instant classic!

Rocksteady: The Roots of Reggae